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Dave Paulsen

Discussion in 'Basketball' started by GMURaider, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. psyclone

    psyclone All-Conference

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    What percentage does the school receive? One might argue that the $$ received the school receives (assuming that it is directed largely toward classrooms/facilities, faculty recruitment and retention,student services) provides support for ALL the students, including student athletes. Having the money go to the university athletic department results in outrageous salaries for assistant coaches and other scandalous expenditures like lazy rivers next to the athletic dorms (I think I saw that the strength coach at Alabama makes more than the University president).

    The article in the twitter link points out that 98% of student athletes go on to non-professional sports occupations. Spreading the money around to benefit all students seems reasonably equitable.
  2. FreeGunston12

    FreeGunston12 Specialist

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    If there is one thing I'm sure of, it's that I don't understand all of the arguments for and against paying student athletes.

    With that being said, and for the sake of simplification for simple-minded people like me, if we take that $81 million and divide it all between all NCAA athletes (450,000 - 500,000ish) then they all don't even get $200. So we've been spending all this time and energy arguing over $200?

    Now I know that that the money would never be divided evenly for all levels, sports, or individual athletes, but what do you then do about the athletes that are costing more money than they are generating? Goodbye lesser sports. Goodbye title 9. Right?

    Someone educate me.
  3. jmckend1

    jmckend1 Starter

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    If you start paying athletes, it should first, dollar-for-dollar, reduce their athletic scholarship and other costs associated with the "perks" of being an athlete, such as private tutors. At the point you are getting paid you are now under contract for a service and should recieve only that pay as consideration. Otherwise you're double dipping and if I was one paying to attend, especially with student loans and I saw that shit happening, I'd have a lawsuit ready.
    gmujim92 likes this.
  4. gmujim92

    gmujim92 Hall of Famer

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    Between tuition, housing, food, trainers, tutoring and almost unlimited amounts of gear (including several pairs of shoes every season that retail for more than $100 apiece), our basketball players are doing pretty well for themselves.

    Honestly, at other than the top 10-15 richest schools, I'm not sure if student-athletes would come out significantly ahead if you paid them a salary (commensurate with revenue) but deducted for all the expenses related to their education.
  5. gmujim92

    gmujim92 Hall of Famer

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    I don't begrudge the players anything. Just pointing out that there is a value to everything they receive above and beyond a free college education that's worth $200,000 in many cases.
    Mason2005 likes this.
  6. Mason2005

    Mason2005 Starter

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    They also get all the chicks!

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
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  7. GSII

    GSII All-American

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    Let alumni pay their fav athlete.
  8. GSII

    GSII All-American

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    Like all the big boys.
  9. Petey Buckets

    Petey Buckets Sixth Man

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    I think the pay the players/don't pay the players conversation generally misses the point. If you lift the *restriction* on paying players and allow them to get paid, or allow them to receive whatever sort of impermissible benefits usually get programs in trouble, the problem will solve itself. Schools that can afford to pay will pay. Other schools will pay what they can, and the schools that can't pay get the players left over. No reason to stop boosters from giving as many hundred dollar handshakes as they want to.

    The thing about doing it this way is that it doesn't really change the balance of power. The best recruits still go to the programs that can spend the most (Kentucky, Duke, UNC, etc). Schools can choose to spend their way into relevance like Oregon or Gonzaga. Schools already spend money to get recruits, just not in a way that allows the recruits to actually see it.
  10. Vurbel

    Vurbel Hall of Famer

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    If we do that we might as well have 4 national champions.

    Group A: UNC, Duke, Kentucky, Indiana, UCLA, Michigan, Michigan St., Ohio St., Syracuse, Kansas, Indiana, Oregon, Louisville

    Group B: Georgetown, Maryland, Wake Forest, NC State, Boston College, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Missouri, USC, UNLV, Georgia Tech, Baylor, Clemson, Fla. St, Miami, Notre Dame

    Group C: Us, Dayton, VCU, GW, UMass, Texas Tech, Vanderbilt, Boston College

    Grop D: Elon, UNCG, Stephen F. Austin, Vermont, Hampton, UMBC.
  11. MasonSAE4

    MasonSAE4 Starter

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    Think you might be being a bit kind to Boston College
  12. Vurbel

    Vurbel Hall of Famer

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    True. My mistake.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. Jack Strop

    Jack Strop Sixth Man

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    Paying NCAA athletes is a slap in face to those who struggled to pay for a college degree. I went to Mason on the 5½ year plan. I had to pay half of my way working 30+ hours a week in retail. I knew others who had to pay even more for their education. Unlike most athletes, I didn't have the luxury of free tutors, free meals, free sneakers, free medical care, and free personal/group counseling. Scholarahip or not, athletes get benefits for playing a sport that regular students don't.

    I know many on this forum followed a similar path. They, like me, would have gladly played a sport in exchange for the toil of supporting their education. Scholarship players already get paid to go to school by virtue of their scholarships. However, I would be in favor of providing a little bit more to the athletes who don't get scholarships. They're the ones who truly deserve it. They have to pay for school, go to school, and compete for the school—those students are my heroes.
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017
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  14. FreeGunston12

    FreeGunston12 Specialist

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    Agree on most points, except the last. Those athletes don't have to compete for the school. They choose to because they want to. It is a priveledge, and one that they deserve. Do they hope for a scholarship? Sure. But they can choose not to compete if it is no longer worth it to them. They are in that position because the money/scholarships are better spent elsewhere. For what it's worth, I think that the athletes without scholarships prove that paying players is completely unnecessary.
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  15. Patriotsince81

    Patriotsince81 Starter

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  16. gmu05

    gmu05 Starter

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  17. ephoops

    ephoops Preferred Walk-On

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    I believe that Ryan Frazier, the new grad asst., is a great hire for the program.

    I know that he was very highly regarded in the Bucknell community -- both on and off the court.

    Paulsen's quote:

    "Ryan is one of the most competitive and driven players I've ever coached," Paulsen said. "He got the absolute maximum out of his basketball ability during his career. He was a relentless competitor, a great defender and became a phenomenal leader within our program as well as on campus. He earned the respect of everyone in the Bucknell community for his thoughtful role on campus during some racially-charged conversations at the time. He's going to be a terrific mentor to our student-athletes and a great addition to our staff."
  18. Patriot8

    Patriot8 Starter

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    No.. that'd be Basketball Ops and Managers..
    IMG_1682.GIF
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  19. Patriotsince81

    Patriotsince81 Starter

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    We'll just agree to disagree. It's the little things that go unnoticed that can reap huge reward. This quote from Paulsen in particular made me feel even better about the direction we are headed, "....University as a whole for providing us with this level of personnel support that is consistent with the rest of the Atlantic 10 and the top programs nationally." Sorry you don't see it that way.
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2017
  20. gmujim92

    gmujim92 Hall of Famer

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    You couldn't be more wrong. These guys will have a significant impact by taking duties off the assistant coaches' plates and giving them more time to spend working directly with the players and hitting the road to recruit.

    Scouting has gotten much more sophisticated in college basketball, thanks to technology, and the size of a top-level A10 staff has grown along with it.

    VCU has both a director of player development and a director of student-athlete development, in addition to grad assistants, student managers, strength coach video coordinator, the DOBO and on-court coaching staff.

    Those guys take care of a lot of behind-the-scenes stuff that the four coaches don't have to worry about.

    It might seem like overkill, but just like with facilities, it is what it takes to compete at the top of the A10. It's great that Edwards recognizes that and is giving our staff a chance to fight without one hand tied behind their backs.

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